Ana Arjona Assistant Professor

Research Interest(s):  Conflict and Violence; Civil War; State Building; Local Governance; Drug Trafficking; Drug Policy; Philosophy of Social Sciences

Program Area(s):  Comparative Politics

Regional Specialization(s):  Latin America

Department Strength(s):  Conflict Studies

Ana Arjona’s academic interests include violence and conflict, the foundations of political order, state building, local governance, drug trafficking, and drug policy. She is also interested in the philosophy of social sciences. Her current research projects investigate the causes and consequences of institutional change and individual agency in contexts of violence. Her work combines different methods and types of evidence. She has conducted extensive fieldwork in Colombia and has also carried field research in Kosovo. At Northwestern she teaches on civil war, research design, and the relation between illegal drugs and politics. Her work has been funded by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, SSRC, the United States Institute of Peace, Yale University, and Columbia University in the U.S.; the International Development Research Centre in Canada; the Folke Bernadotte Academy in Sweden; and the Department for International Development and the Economic and Social Research Council in the U.K.

Select Publications

  • Arjona, Ana, 2014. “Wartime Institutions: A Research Agenda”. Forthcoming, Journal of Conflict Resolution.
  • Arjona, Ana, Nelson Kasfir and Zachariah Mampilly (Editors), 2014. Rebel Governance in Civil War. Forthcoming, Cambridge University Press.
  • Arjona, Ana, 2014. “Resisting Rebel Rulers”. In Arjona, Ana, Nelson Kasfir and Zachariah Mampilly (Eds), Rebel Governance. Forthcoming, Cambridge University Press.
  • Arjona, Ana and Stathis Kalyvas, 2011. “Recruitment into Armed Groups in Colombia: A Survey of Demobilized Fighters.” In Yvan Guichaoua (Ed.), Understanding Collective Political Violence. Macmillan Palgrave.
  • Arjona, Ana, 2009. “One National War, Multiple Local Orders: An Inquiry into the Unit of Analysis of War and Post-war Interventions.” In M. Bergsmo and P. Kalmanovitz (Eds), Law in Peace Negotiations. Oslo: Torkel Opsahl Academic Publisher.
  • Arjona, Ana, 2008. “Local Orders in Warring Times: Armed Groups’ and Civilians’ Strategies in Civil War.” Qualitative Methods: Newsletter of the American Political Science Association Organized Section for Qualitative and Multi-Method Research. Spring.

Courses taught

  • Drugs and Politics, Political Science 377
  • Civilians in War, Political Science 395
  • Civil War: Microfoundations and Local Dynamics, Political Science 490
  • Proseminar in Comparative Politics, Political Science 490