Galya Ben-Arieh Senior Lecturer

Research Interest(s):  Forced Migration and Refugee Studies, Citizenship, Comparative Constitutionalism, Testimony and International Criminal Justice; Conflict Studies

Program Area(s):  Comparative Politics; Law and Politics; Political Theory

Regional Specialization(s):  Africa; Europe; United States; Middle East

Department Strength(s):  Law and Politics

Professor Ruffer is the founding Director of the Center for Forced Migration Studies housed at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies at Northwestern University. Her work centers on refugee and asylum rights and protection, rule of law and the process of international justice. She has published on testimony and justice in the DR Congo, asylum law and policy, human rights litigation in transnational courts and immigrant incorporation and integration in Europe. Her books include Adjudicating Refugee and Asylum Status: The Role of Witness, Expertise, and Testimony (co-edited with Benjamin Lawrance), Cambridge University Press (2015) and Prosecution, Persecution, Protection: Doing Justice for Sexual Violence (forthcoming). She serves on the executive committee of the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration, Chairs the American Bar Association International Refugee Law Committee and has been appointed to the American Immigration Lawyer’s Association National Asylum Committee. Aside from her academic work, she has worked as an immigration attorney representing political asylum claimants both as a solo-practitioner and as a pro-bono attorney. Most recently she has been involved with the award winning AILA-AIC Pro Bono Project representing Central American detained women and children.

BooksBook Cover: Adjudicating Refugee and Asylum Status by Gayla Ruffer

  • Adjudicating Refugee and Asylum Status: The Role of Witness, Expertise, and Testimony (co-edited with Benjamin Lawrance), Cambridge University Press (2014)

Select Publications

  • “Testimony of Sexual Violence in the DR Congo and the Injustice of Rape: Moral Outrage, Epistemic Injustice and the Failures of Bearing Witness,” Oregon Review of International Law (Spring 2014).
  • “Legal Forms and Democratic Citizens in Republican Theory,” in Andreas Niederberger and Philipp Schink, editors, Republican Democracy: Liberty, Law and Politics (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2013)
  • “Pushed Beyond Recognition? The Liberality of Family Reunification Policies in the EU,” Journal of Ethnic Migration Studies (July 2011).
  • “The Cosmopolitics of Asylum Seekers in the European Union,” New Political Science, 27:3 (September 2005).
  • “Courts Across Borders: The Implications of Judicial Agency for Human Rights and Democracy,” (with David Jacobson), Human Rights Quarterly, 25:1 (February 2003).
  • Reprinted in:
“Agency on a Global Scale: Rule, Rights and the European Union,” (with David Jacobson), in Alison Brysk and Gershon Shafir, editors, Citizenship and Human Rights in an Age of Globalization (University of Rutgers Press, 2004).
  • “Agency on a Global Scale: Rule, Rights and the European Union,” (with David Jacobson) in Marco Giugni and Florence Passy, editors,Dialogues on Migration Policy (Lexington: Lanham, MD, March 2006). 

Courses taught

  • Refugee Crises and Human Rights
  • INT_ST 398 1,2,3 International Studies Honors Seminar